13th July 2014

Video

(RealNews)  Reality Asserts Itself with Shir Hever

Pt. 1/4  Growing Up Privileged in Apartheid, Colonial Israel.
Mr. Hever says he became politically active after the Second Intifada was repressed with extreme violence by the Israeli military and police.

Pt. 2/4  Fear and Loathing in Israel.
Mr. Hever says in colonial conditions the master fears and hates the servants who might rise up and demand their rights.

Pt. 3/4  Israel, World Capital of Homeland Security Industries.
Mr. Hever says Israel sells weapons and equipment of repression to countries with extreme inequality.

Pt. 4/4 An Occupier’s Peace or a Just Peace.
Mr. Hever says the occupiers always want peace - one that strengthens the status quo

Shir Hever is an economic researcher in the Alternative Information Center, a Palestinian-Israeli organization active in Jerusalem and Beit-Sahour. Hever researches the economic aspect of the Israeli occupation of the Palestinian territory, some of his research topics include the international aid to the Palestinians and to Israel, the effects of the Israeli occupation of the Palestinian territories on the Israeli economy, and the boycott, divestment and sanctions campaigns against Israel. His work also includes giving lectures and presentations on the economy of the occupation. He is a graduate student at the Freie Universitat in Berlin, and researches the privatization of security in Israel. His first book: Political Economy of Israel’s Occupation: Repression Beyond Exploitation, was published by Pluto Press.

Tagged: Israelracismgenocideapartheid

Source: therealnews.com

13th July 2014

Question reblogged from science in a can with 34 notes

Anonymous said: 160,000,000% yes for the bio series being compiled into a pdf, please. So the way I understand it is that you will be compiling them (if you choose to, please choose to) in terms of subjects/topics? Like cellular biology, genetics (if there was, sorry I'm a new follower), microbiology, etc., will all have their own pdf file?

sciencesoup:

I’ll compile it however you guys want it compiled :)

I was thinking all in one, with a chapter for each topic, but if you want it available another way, just let me know. Crowd-sourcin’ this decision—come at me with ideas.

And FYI, genetics is the last topic, so you’ll see that in the next couple of weeks!

13th July 2014

Photo reblogged from xySciences with 81 notes

xysciences:

The long nosed chimera fish. 
[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

xysciences:

The long nosed chimera fish. 

[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

13th July 2014

Question reblogged from science in a can with 41 notes

reesespuffsforlife said: Who runs this page good lord this page is amazing I LOVE SCIENCE THANK YOU FOR THE KNOWLEDGE

sciencesoup:

science loves you too and thanks you for reading

also this page is run by this nerd

13th July 2014

Question reblogged from The crafty chemist with 13 notes

winds-of-terra said: Have you heard of F2O2? (FOOF). I read a very humorous article on it some time ago. Very scary compound. Could make a good post about it ^^

thecraftychemist:

I have now, but there’s not really a lot of literature about it - it seems like one of those compounds that people are just too scared to use for anything, and with good reason. I might consider it if I come across something particularly fascinating about it or if I’m doing a series - perhaps a ‘Chemicals I never want to work with’ theme might suit? I don’t want to get onto a government watch list over for that (Hell Mark Raffalo is on one for organizing screenings of a documentary protesting natural gas). Not that any regular member of the public could get their hands on or manufacture this particularly nasty chemical… as for anyone that can they’re usually intelligent enough not to mess with something explosive, corrosive, and capable of detonating things at -180C. I kid you not.

I believe this is the article you were referring to?

13th July 2014

Photo reblogged from New England Aquarium with 53 notes

neaq:

Visitor Pictures: We’re really digging nerdrvt's Flickr album.

New England Aquarium on Flickr.
I love photographing banggai cardinalfish. They sit still! :)

neaq:

Visitor Pictures: We’re really digging nerdrvt's Flickr album.

New England Aquarium on Flickr.

I love photographing banggai cardinalfish. They sit still! :)

Source: nerdrvt

13th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from My Public Lands with 84 notes

mypubliclands:

Check out the recreation.gov feature article about Organ Mountains—Desert Peaks National Monument, New Mexico.

The 496,330 acre Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument was established on May 21, 2014, by Presidential Proclamation. The BLM-managed national monument includes four distinct areas: the Organ Mountains, Desert Peaks, Potrillo Mountains, and Doña Ana Mountains.

While all four areas offer unique recreational opportunities, the most developed portion of the monument is the Organ Mountains which is the location of the Visitor Center at Dripping Springs. The Organ Mountains are a steep, angular mountain range with rocky spires that jut majestically above the Chihuahuan Desert floor to an elevation of 9,000 feet. It is so named because the needle-like spires resemble the pipes of an organ. This picturesque area of rocky peaks, narrow canyons, and open woodlands ranges from Chihuahuan Desert habitat to ponderosa pine in the highest elevations. Located adjacent to and on the east side of Las Cruces, this part of the Monument provides many opportunities for photography, hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking, camping, and wildlife viewing. There are several recreation areas within the Monument including the Dripping Springs Natural Area, the Aguirre Spring Campground, four National Recreation Trails, and many miles of hiking, horseback riding, and mountain biking trails.

CLICK HERE to plan your visit and #SeeBLM.

Photos by Lisa Phillips, BLM New Mexico

13th July 2014

Quote reblogged from CORPORIS FABRICA with 9 notes

The physician must be able to tell the antecedents, know the present, and foretell the future — must mediate these things, and have two special objects in view with regard to disease, namely, to do good or to do no harm.
— Hippocrates (via corporisfabrica)

13th July 2014

Photo reblogged from My Public Lands with 249 notes

mypubliclands:

americasgreatoutdoors:

Gliding through mountains, canyons, meadows, and the vast farmlands of the Snake River plains, lined with commanding cottonwood galleries and a lush shrub understory, the Snake River Corridor is truly a beautiful and unique destination. The area offers diverse recreational opportunities with over 300,000 visits per year and sustains a broad variety of plant, fish, bird and wildlife populations. It is also home to the federally threatened Ute ladies’ tresses orchid and is a world-famous blue ribbon fishery, supporting the largest wild Yellowstone cutthroat trout population outside of Yellowstone National Park. The first World Fly Fishing Championship in North America was even hosted here in 1997. Thanks in part to the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) this area will continue to be preserved and enjoyed.  Photo copyright: Leland Howard

Great photo of BLM-managed lands in Idaho!
Check out "This Week at Interior, July 11, 2014" that highlights ways in which the Land and Water Conservation Fund supports outdoor recreation, local conservation, and clean water projects across the country.
The video includes great footage of BLM Director Kornze and partners biking at Oregon’s Sandy Ridge Trails, in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the LWCF Act.  See photos from the event on BLM Oregon’s Flickr Site. #SeeBLM #SeeOregon #BLMproud

mypubliclands:

americasgreatoutdoors:

Gliding through mountains, canyons, meadows, and the vast farmlands of the Snake River plains, lined with commanding cottonwood galleries and a lush shrub understory, the Snake River Corridor is truly a beautiful and unique destination. The area offers diverse recreational opportunities with over 300,000 visits per year and sustains a broad variety of plant, fish, bird and wildlife populations. It is also home to the federally threatened Ute ladies’ tresses orchid and is a world-famous blue ribbon fishery, supporting the largest wild Yellowstone cutthroat trout population outside of Yellowstone National Park. The first World Fly Fishing Championship in North America was even hosted here in 1997. Thanks in part to the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) this area will continue to be preserved and enjoyed.  

Photo copyright: Leland Howard

Great photo of BLM-managed lands in Idaho!

Check out "This Week at Interior, July 11, 2014" that highlights ways in which the Land and Water Conservation Fund supports outdoor recreation, local conservation, and clean water projects across the country.

The video includes great footage of BLM Director Kornze and partners biking at Oregon’s Sandy Ridge Trails, in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the LWCF Act.  See photos from the event on BLM Oregon’s Flickr Site. #SeeBLM #SeeOregon #BLMproud

Source: americasgreatoutdoors

13th July 2014

Video reblogged from Smithsonian 3D Digitization with 203 notes

smithsonian3d:

Learn how Smithsonian Gardens used #3D tech to study the rare Embreea orchid and the Eulema bee pollinator. #SIx3D - smithsonian

13th July 2014

Photo with 8 notes

(JPL/NASA/CXC/SAO)  Evolution of a Supernova
These illustrations show the progression of a supernova blast. A massive star (left), which has created elements as heavy as iron in its interior, blows up in a tremendous explosion (middle), scattering its outer layers in a structure called a supernova remnant (right). The supernova explosion itself also creates many elements, including those heavier than iron, such as gold. New observations from NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, are filling in the missing pieces in the puzzle of how massive stars explode.
(more…)

(JPL/NASA/CXC/SAO)  Evolution of a Supernova

These illustrations show the progression of a supernova blast. A massive star (left), which has created elements as heavy as iron in its interior, blows up in a tremendous explosion (middle), scattering its outer layers in a structure called a supernova remnant (right). The supernova explosion itself also creates many elements, including those heavier than iron, such as gold. New observations from NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, are filling in the missing pieces in the puzzle of how massive stars explode.

(more…)

Tagged: astronomysupernova progression

Source: jpl.nasa.gov

13th July 2014

Photo with 6 notes

(JPL/NASA-Caltech-Harvard-Smithsonian)  Chaotic Star Birth
Located 1,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Perseus, a reflection nebula called NGC 1333 epitomizes the beautiful chaos of a dense group of stars being born. Most of the visible light from the young stars in this region is obscured by the dense, dusty cloud in which they formed. With NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, scientists can detect the infrared light from these objects. This allows a look through the dust to gain a more detailed understanding of how stars like our sun begin their lives.
The young stars in NGC 1333 do not form a single cluster, but are split between two sub-groups. One group is to the north near the nebula shown as red in the image. The other group is south, where the features shown in yellow and green abound in the densest part of the natal gas cloud. With the sharp infrared eyes of Spitzer, scientists can detect and characterize the warm and dusty disks of material that surround forming stars. By looking for differences in the disk properties between the two subgroups, they hope to find hints of the star and planet formation history of this region.
The knotty yellow-green features located in the lower portion of the image are glowing shock fronts where jets of material, spewed from extremely young embryonic stars, are plowing into the cold, dense gas nearby. The sheer number of separate jets that appear in this region is unprecedented. This leads scientists to believe that by stirring up the cold gas, the jets may contribute to the eventual dispersal of the gas cloud, preventing more stars from forming in NGC 1333.
In contrast, the upper portion of the image is dominated by the infrared light from warm dust, shown as red.

(JPL/NASA-Caltech-Harvard-Smithsonian)  Chaotic Star Birth

Located 1,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Perseus, a reflection nebula called NGC 1333 epitomizes the beautiful chaos of a dense group of stars being born. Most of the visible light from the young stars in this region is obscured by the dense, dusty cloud in which they formed. With NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, scientists can detect the infrared light from these objects. This allows a look through the dust to gain a more detailed understanding of how stars like our sun begin their lives.

The young stars in NGC 1333 do not form a single cluster, but are split between two sub-groups. One group is to the north near the nebula shown as red in the image. The other group is south, where the features shown in yellow and green abound in the densest part of the natal gas cloud. With the sharp infrared eyes of Spitzer, scientists can detect and characterize the warm and dusty disks of material that surround forming stars. By looking for differences in the disk properties between the two subgroups, they hope to find hints of the star and planet formation history of this region.

The knotty yellow-green features located in the lower portion of the image are glowing shock fronts where jets of material, spewed from extremely young embryonic stars, are plowing into the cold, dense gas nearby. The sheer number of separate jets that appear in this region is unprecedented. This leads scientists to believe that by stirring up the cold gas, the jets may contribute to the eventual dispersal of the gas cloud, preventing more stars from forming in NGC 1333.

In contrast, the upper portion of the image is dominated by the infrared light from warm dust, shown as red.

Tagged: astronomyreflection nebulaNGC 1333

Source: jpl.nasa.gov

13th July 2014

Photo with 7 notes

(JPL/NASA)  Weighing in on the Dumbbell Nebula
The “Dumbbell nebula,” also known as Messier 27, pumps out infrared light in this image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope. The nebula was named after its resemblance to a dumbbell as seen in visible light. It was discovered in 1764 by Charles Messier, who included it as the 27th member of his famous catalog of nebulous objects. Though he did not know it at the time, this was the first in a class of objects, now known as “planetary nebulae,” to make it into the catalog.
Planetary nebulae, historically named for their resemblance to gas-giant planets, are now known to be the remains of stars that once looked a lot like our sun. When sun-like stars die, they puff out their outer gaseous layers. These layers are heated by the hot core of the dead star, called a white dwarf, and shine with infrared and visible-light colors. Our own sun will blossom into a planetary nebula when it dies in about five billion years.
The Dumbbell nebula is 1,360 light-years away in the Vulpecula constellation, and stretches across 4.5 light-years of space. That would more that fill the space between our sun and the nearest star, and it demonstrates how effective planetary nebulae are at returning much of a star’s material back to interstellar space at the end of their lives.
(more…)

(JPL/NASA)  Weighing in on the Dumbbell Nebula

The “Dumbbell nebula,” also known as Messier 27, pumps out infrared light in this image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope. The nebula was named after its resemblance to a dumbbell as seen in visible light. It was discovered in 1764 by Charles Messier, who included it as the 27th member of his famous catalog of nebulous objects. Though he did not know it at the time, this was the first in a class of objects, now known as “planetary nebulae,” to make it into the catalog.

Planetary nebulae, historically named for their resemblance to gas-giant planets, are now known to be the remains of stars that once looked a lot like our sun. When sun-like stars die, they puff out their outer gaseous layers. These layers are heated by the hot core of the dead star, called a white dwarf, and shine with infrared and visible-light colors. Our own sun will blossom into a planetary nebula when it dies in about five billion years.

The Dumbbell nebula is 1,360 light-years away in the Vulpecula constellation, and stretches across 4.5 light-years of space. That would more that fill the space between our sun and the nearest star, and it demonstrates how effective planetary nebulae are at returning much of a star’s material back to interstellar space at the end of their lives.

(more…)

Tagged: astronomyDumbbell nebulaM(essier) 27planetary nebula

Source: jpl.nasa.gov

13th July 2014

Photo reblogged from xySciences with 114 notes

xysciences:

Interactive 3d transfer of data. 
[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

xysciences:

Interactive 3d transfer of data. 

[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

13th July 2014

Photo with 5 notes

(ESA) Earth from Space - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Guanabara Bay in southeast Brazil is pictured in this image from the Sentinel-1A satellite.
The city of Rio de Janeiro lies on the western banks of the bay and along the Atlantic coast to the south. Rio is connected to the city of Niterói on the east side of the bay by a large bridge which appears as a dotted straight line. To the north, we can see radar reflections from large ships.
Governador is the largest island in Guanabara Bay, and the site of Rio de Janeiro’s main airport. The runways appear as dark lines.
(more…)

(ESA) Earth from Space - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Guanabara Bay in southeast Brazil is pictured in this image from the Sentinel-1A satellite.

The city of Rio de Janeiro lies on the western banks of the bay and along the Atlantic coast to the south. Rio is connected to the city of Niterói on the east side of the bay by a large bridge which appears as a dotted straight line. To the north, we can see radar reflections from large ships.

Governador is the largest island in Guanabara Bay, and the site of Rio de Janeiro’s main airport. The runways appear as dark lines.

(more…)

Tagged: SpaceEarthBrazilRio de JaneiroGuanabara BayGovernador Island

Source: esa.int