Or

The Art of Science

3rd September 2014

Photo reblogged from The crafty chemist with 1,427 notes

exploratorium:

Amoebae use molecular mechanisms to move. Despite their tiny size, they’re giants compared to other types of cells!

exploratorium:

Amoebae use molecular mechanisms to move. Despite their tiny size, they’re giants compared to other types of cells!

Source: exploratorium

3rd September 2014

Video reblogged from WWF with 47 notes

wwf:

You can help save polar bears: http://bit.ly/Z5ngAG Gert Polet and Geoff York of WWF demonstrate the processing of the samples collected from polar bear footprints. For the first time, scientists working in partnership with WWF have isolated polar bear DNA from a track left in the snow. This method could make polar bear monitoring much less expensive in the future. Follow the story: http://ift.tt/1uwHxIX RID 3868

3rd September 2014

Photo reblogged from Colin Hutton Photography with 16 notes

colinhuttonphotography:

Atala butterflies - Eumaeus atala on Flickr.

colinhuttonphotography:

Atala butterflies - Eumaeus atala on Flickr.

3rd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Vimeo Blog with 478 notes

vimeo:

What were once street lights lights become a highway to another dimension.

Watch.

3rd September 2014

Link reblogged from The crafty chemist with 125 notes

Camera Robot Made For Disney Now Inspects Bridges →

txchnologist:

image

by Michael Keller

Bridges are made to transport vehicles, not to make it easy for inspectors to do their job. That’s why inspecting the undersides and support pillars of tall ones is no easy task, either requiring people looking for problems to perform feats of…

Source: txchnologist

3rd September 2014

Photo reblogged from New England Aquarium with 92 notes

neaq:

Visitor Pictures: These may look other worldly, but these are the beautiful Leidy’s comb jellies in their own space. Jellies! So many jellies at the New England Aquarium. 

neaq:

Visitor Pictures: These may look other worldly, but these are the beautiful Leidy’s comb jellies in their own space. Jellies! So many jellies at the New England Aquarium

Source: missingtooth

3rd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Random things with 8,366 notes

atraversso:

Beautiful Forest by Mirko Fikentscher

Source: atraversso

3rd September 2014

Photo reblogged from Ultrafacts.tumblr.com with 3,359 notes

ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

3rd September 2014

Photo with 3 notes

(Earthobservatory.nasa.com)  Sunrise Dam Goldmine

Roughly 55 kilometers (35 miles) south of Laverton, Western Australia, lies the Sunrise Dam Gold Mine. A gold deposit was discovered in the area in 1988, and by 1995, the mine was open for business. Started as an open pit mine, the operation expanded to include underground mining in 2003. The mine produces roughly 460,000 ounces of gold each year, according to AngloGold Ashanti, which operates the mine.

The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on NASA’s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite captured this true-color image of the Sunrise Dam Gold Mine on December 4, 2009. The main pit’s terraced landscape appears in shades of gray in the left half of this image, and a mine waste facility appears on the right. In 2008, the central pit at Sunrise Dam reportedly reached a depth of 440 meters (1,445 feet). The straight line running diagonally through the lower right quadrant of the image is probably a landing strip; miners at Sunrise Dam frequently fly in and out of the remote area.
Away from the mining operation, the landscape appears in shades of brown. The physical environment around Sunrise Dam Gold Mine is flat and arid, comprised of sand and gypsum-rich dunes and saltpans. Acacia trees and shrubs well adapted to dry environments make up the vegetation in this warm, dry region.

(Earthobservatory.nasa.com) Sunrise Dam Goldmine

Roughly 55 kilometers (35 miles) south of Laverton, Western Australia, lies the Sunrise Dam Gold Mine. A gold deposit was discovered in the area in 1988, and by 1995, the mine was open for business. Started as an open pit mine, the operation expanded to include underground mining in 2003. The mine produces roughly 460,000 ounces of gold each year, according to AngloGold Ashanti, which operates the mine.

The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on NASA’s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite captured this true-color image of the Sunrise Dam Gold Mine on December 4, 2009. The main pit’s terraced landscape appears in shades of gray in the left half of this image, and a mine waste facility appears on the right. In 2008, the central pit at Sunrise Dam reportedly reached a depth of 440 meters (1,445 feet). The straight line running diagonally through the lower right quadrant of the image is probably a landing strip; miners at Sunrise Dam frequently fly in and out of the remote area.
Away from the mining operation, the landscape appears in shades of brown. The physical environment around Sunrise Dam Gold Mine is flat and arid, comprised of sand and gypsum-rich dunes and saltpans. Acacia trees and shrubs well adapted to dry environments make up the vegetation in this warm, dry region.

3rd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Tatterhood with 7,675 notes

tatterhood:

Save the viking goats!!!

Johanna Thorvaldsdóttir’s Icelandic goat farm (Háafell) is facing foreclosure in September, resulting in the entire goat flock being butchered - unless enough funds are raised to save it!

There are less than 820 Icelandic goats in the entire world - they are an endangered species. Almost half of them will be lost if this farm is not saved. I visited Háafell 2 years ago and every goat I draw is rooted in this place. Any little bit helps :)

3rd September 2014

Photo reblogged from Mind Blowing Science! with 4,046 notes

thekidshouldseethis:


When a magnetic field moves through a conductor a current called an Eddy current is induced in the conductor due to the magnetic field’s movement. The flow of electrons in the conductor creates an opposing magnetic field to the magnet which results in damping of the magnet and causes heating inside of the conductor similar to heat buildup inside of power cords. The loss of energy used to heat up the conductor is equal to the loss of kinetic energy by the magnet.

Watch the video.

thekidshouldseethis:

When a magnetic field moves through a conductor a current called an Eddy current is induced in the conductor due to the magnetic field’s movement. The flow of electrons in the conductor creates an opposing magnetic field to the magnet which results in damping of the magnet and causes heating inside of the conductor similar to heat buildup inside of power cords. The loss of energy used to heat up the conductor is equal to the loss of kinetic energy by the magnet.

Watch the video.

Source: thekidshouldseethis

3rd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Child of the Cosmos with 88,053 notes

Episode 13: Unafraid of the Dark, Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey

3rd September 2014

Photo reblogged from Mind Blowing Science! with 210 notes

currentsinbiology:

New type of cell movement discovered
In a new study from the University of Pennsylvania and National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, scientists used an innovative technique to study how cells move in a three-dimensional matrix, similar to the structure of certain tissues, such as the skin. They discovered an entirely new type of cell movement whereby the nucleus helps propel cells through the matrix like a piston in an engine, generating pressure that thrusts the cell’s plasma membrane forward.

"Our work elucidated a highly intriguing question: how cells move when they are in the complex and physiologically relevant environment of a 3-D extracellular matrix," said Hyun (Michel) Koo, a professor in the Department of Orthodontics at Penn’s School of Dental Medicine. "We discovered that the nucleus can act as a piston that physically compartmentalizes the cell cytoplasm and increases the hydrostatic pressure driving the cell motility within a 3-D matrix."

R. J. Petrie, H. Koo, K. M. Yamada. Generation of compartmentalized pressure by a nuclear piston governs cell motility in a 3D matrix. Science, 2014; 345 (6200): 1062 DOI: 10.1126/science.1256965
Penn and NIH researchers measured the internal pressure of individual fibroblast cells (in orange) moving through a three-dimensional matrix (in blue). They found that, in this environment, the cells’ nuclei operate like an engine’s piston to push the cell forward.  Credit: University of Pennsylvania/NIDCR

currentsinbiology:

New type of cell movement discovered

In a new study from the University of Pennsylvania and National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, scientists used an innovative technique to study how cells move in a three-dimensional matrix, similar to the structure of certain tissues, such as the skin. They discovered an entirely new type of cell movement whereby the nucleus helps propel cells through the matrix like a piston in an engine, generating pressure that thrusts the cell’s plasma membrane forward.

"Our work elucidated a highly intriguing question: how cells move when they are in the complex and physiologically relevant environment of a 3-D extracellular matrix," said Hyun (Michel) Koo, a professor in the Department of Orthodontics at Penn’s School of Dental Medicine. "We discovered that the nucleus can act as a piston that physically compartmentalizes the cell cytoplasm and increases the hydrostatic pressure driving the cell motility within a 3-D matrix."

R. J. Petrie, H. Koo, K. M. Yamada. Generation of compartmentalized pressure by a nuclear piston governs cell motility in a 3D matrix. Science, 2014; 345 (6200): 1062 DOI: 10.1126/science.1256965

Penn and NIH researchers measured the internal pressure of individual fibroblast cells (in orange) moving through a three-dimensional matrix (in blue). They found that, in this environment, the cells’ nuclei operate like an engine’s piston to push the cell forward.  Credit: University of Pennsylvania/NIDCR

Source: currentsinbiology

2nd September 2014

Photo reblogged from The crafty chemist with 121,430 notes

acannibalisticsandwich:

bengbengwuntwotwah:

whitestuffknowslimits:

heytheretylerr:

WHAT KIND OF WIZARD FISH IS THIS

DUDE THATS A BABY KAIJU

ITS ACTUALLY EATING A LITTLE CREATURE THAT EMITS A CHEMICAL THAT MAKES WATER LIGHT UP WITH BIOLUMINESCENCE COS ITS SCARED OF BEING EATEN AND THEN THE FISH REALISES ITS VISIBLE AND SPITS IT OUT COS IT DOESNT WANT TO BE SEEN BY BIGGER PREDATORS. SO YES ESSENTIALY A WIZARD FISH

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^Get a load of this nerd

acannibalisticsandwich:

bengbengwuntwotwah:

whitestuffknowslimits:

heytheretylerr:

WHAT KIND OF WIZARD FISH IS THIS

DUDE THATS A BABY KAIJU

ITS ACTUALLY EATING A LITTLE CREATURE THAT EMITS A CHEMICAL THAT MAKES WATER LIGHT UP WITH BIOLUMINESCENCE COS ITS SCARED OF BEING EATEN AND THEN THE FISH REALISES ITS VISIBLE AND SPITS IT OUT COS IT DOESNT WANT TO BE SEEN BY BIGGER PREDATORS. SO YES ESSENTIALY A WIZARD FISH

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Get a load of this nerd

Source: glukauf

2nd September 2014

Photo reblogged from Bijoux et Minéraux with 150 notes

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Getchellite on Stibnite with Orpiment rosettes -  Twin Creeks Mine, Potosi District, Osgood Mts, Humboldt County, Nevada

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Getchellite on Stibnite with Orpiment rosettes -  Twin Creeks Mine, Potosi District, Osgood Mts, Humboldt County, Nevada